Press

A new brain mapping technique reveals circuitry of Parkinson’s disease tremors

The new technique probes the neural pathways that cause these tremors, and also provides a way to map and troubleshoot other circuits in the whole brain.

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Firing laser pulses at neurons wakes up sleeping rats

Researchers have described the thalamus, the brain's 'relay centre' for sensory data, as "like a radio dial" after finding they could alter the brain activity of rats by changing neural firing rates, waking them up or putting them into an unconscious state.

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Scientists manipulate consciousness in rats

Scientists showed that they could alter brain activity of rats and either wake them up or put them in an unconscious state by changing the firing rates of neurons in the central thalamus, a region known to regulate arousal. The study, published in eLIFE, was partially funded by the National Institutes of Health.

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Scientists Pinpoint The "Consciousness Switch" Responsible For Awareness

As neuroscientists strive to demystify the workings of the brain, the pathways responsible for activating and deactivating consciousness have continued to elude them. However, a Stanford University-led team of researchers believe they may have now pinpointed the part of the brain responsible for switching awareness on and off. If confirmed by future studies, this research could lead to the development of novel treatments for those suffering from consciousness-related disorders, such as excessive sleeping or even comas.

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Road map of awareness could help us rouse unconscious people

The road map of conscious awareness has been deciphered. Now that we know which brain pathways control whether someone is awake or unconscious, we may be able to rouse people from a vegetative or minimally conscious state.

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Brain circuit mechanisms underlying arousal regulation revealed

News outlets report on our discovery of novel whole-brain circuit mechanisms underlying arousal regulation.


Scientists reveal brain circuit mechanisms underlying arousal regulation

A new study shows that a circuit in a brain structure called the thalamus acts like a radio, with different stations operating at different frequencies and appealing to different “listening audiences."

Image courtesy Lili Guo

Story featured on home page of Neuroscience Institute

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Monitoring the progress of stem cells after transplantation into brain

NIH New Innovator Award program highlights.

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Stem cell stories that caught our eye: spina bifida, review of heart clinical trials, tracking cells and cell switches

California's stem cell agency blog.

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Scientists find way to monitor progress of stem cells after transplantation into brain

The ability to detect successful engraftment, integration, and function of human cells implanted into the brain of a living animal could potentially speed stem-cell therapies’ path to clinical use.

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Professor Lee wins the IEEE BMES BRAIN Young Investigator Award


Professor Jin Hyung Lee and Aaron Gitler receive Stanford Bio-X Interdisciplinary Initiatives Program Award

Professor Jin Hyung Lee and Aaron Gitler jointly received a 2014 Interdisciplinary Initiatives Program Award from the Stanford Bio-X institute. Their proposal titled "Innovating High-Resolution Novel Imaging Approaches to Elucidate Mechanisms of Prion-Like Spreading of Neurodegenerative Disease" is one of 22 selected from a total of 142 letters of intent.

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Electrical Engineering Professor receives Sloan Research Fellowship

Professor Jin Hyung Lee has received a 2012 Sloan Research Fellowship from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. She is one of 126 scientists and scholars from 51 universities in the U.S. and Canada to receive the prestigious fellowship.

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Assistant Professor Jin Hyung Lee receives 2011 NSF CAREER Award

Professor Jin Hyung Lee has been awarded the NSF CAREER Award for her proposal entitled "A New Vivo Brain Circuit Analysis Method using Real-Time, High-Resolution Optogenetic fMRI." This proposal utilizes a newly developed technology called optogenetic fMRI (ofMRI) (pioneered by Dr. Lee) combined with advanced imaging, computation, and applied mathematical algorithms.

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ofMRI on the Brain

A team led by Dr. Jin Hyung Lee is developing optogenetic functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) that would allow systematic analysis and debugging of the ‘brain circuit’.

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Young innovators take research in new directions

Three young researchers in the UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science are opening up new avenues of inquiry and developing new tools for the precise control of nanoparticles, figuring out new ways to “debug” the brain circuit and building ultrasensitive biosensors for the early detection of disease.

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Professor Jin Hyung Lee receives 2010 Okawa Foundation Award

Professor Jin Hyung Lee has been awarded the 2010 Okawa Foundation Research Grant. Her research project entitled "Real-Time Brain Circuit Debugging with Optogenetic Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (ofMRI)" aims to develop a revolutionary new method to debug the brain circuit in real time.

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IEEE Photonoics Society News

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Neuroscience: fMRI under the spotlight

Analyzing a specific class of neuron in the brains of live animals using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) opens the door to mapping genetically defined neural circuits.

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Optogenetic fMRI

New evidence that fMRI experiments are valid measures of neuron activity.

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